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Happy Valley principal Nick Hayes welcomes members of the Lummi Nation.

Relationships with local Native peoples and Tribes are key in place-based approach to social studies

In 2015 the legislature passed a law mandating the teaching of social studies curriculum that accurately conveys the history, challenges and Native perspectives on tribal sovereignty and Native culture. The resulting Since Time Immemorial: Tribal Sovereignty Curriculum was created through a partnership between the state Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction and tribal nations…

Maddie Ellis speaking on the floor

High school students win statewide leadership positions in YMCA Youth and Government program

The future of the state of Washington is in good hands. In May, three Bellingham Public Schools juniors campaigned for and won high-level leadership positions in a YMCA program called Youth and Government. In this program, students learn how to run a state government in hands-on simulation, culminating in an annual four–day mock-Congressional session held in Olympia at the State Capitol.   Sehome’s Thomas Cassella was elected…

The Trip of a Lifetime: Students Head to Spain through World Fellows Program

Three tenth graders from Bellingham Public Schools will embark on the trip of a lifetime this summer as they join the inaugural cohort of World Fellows, as selected by the Lieutenant Governor’s Office. Michelle Jimenez of Squalicum, Aaron Padilla Monterrey of Sehome and Cristina Calleros Martin of Bellingham High School will travel to Leon, Spain…

Global Thinkers: Wade King, Happy Valley and Chinese students learn together

Students from Happy Valley Elementary School and Shandong Normal University joined hands as they danced and sang together at the direction of music specialist Katie Tully. This interaction was made possible through a partnership with Can Edu Consultants in Vancouver, British Columbia. A group of 19 students and three adults from Shandong Normal University came to Bellingham to…

Lessons from the Past: Miners, loggers fill earliest Bellingham schools

In four decades, the settlements on Bellingham Bay grew from a promising coal seam and a lumber mill into two cities with more than 8,000 residents, including speculators hoping to attract a major railroad hub. An early priority of the white settlers, who first arrived in 1852, was to find a means to educate their children. As soon as…